clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Filed under:

Tyre Phillips film study: Could big man be a big help to Giants’ OL?

Baltimore Ravens v Pittsburgh Steelers Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

The New York Giants continue to add pieces to their injured offensive line as Week 1 quickly approaches. After claiming Jack Anderson off waivers from the Philadelphia Eagles, the Giants were awarded Tyre Phillips on waivers from the Baltimore Ravens.

Phillips — a 25-year-old 2020 third-round selection out of Mississippi State -- played significant snaps at guard and tackle over the last two seasons. He has 469 snaps at right tackle, 296 at right guard, and 42 at left guard. Phillips answered the call to play tackle after injuries ravaged Baltimore; he played 347 snaps at right tackle in 2021.

Phillips is 6’5, 345 pounds with 89th percentile arm length and 79th percentile hand size:

His overall mass caps his athletic upside, which is noticeable on film. Still, the Giants need for offensive linemen. They need to find a reliable option to start left guard with Shane Lemieux on IR, and their tackle depth is weak, with Matt Peart ailing from his late season torn ACL.

Phillips profiles better as a guard than a tackle who are often left on islands to protect their outside shoulder - something Phillips struggled to achieve consistently. Nevertheless, Phillips displayed adequate range (when he was disciplined with his hips), has great length, and he’s a massive body with adequate overall power.

Phillips’ first preseason game against the Tennessee Titans was tough; he allowed six pressure and two sacks in 38 pass blocking plays. He had a solid Week 2 and 3, but the Ravens subjected him to waivers where the Giants submitted a claim. Let’s check out some plays from this preseason and the last two regular seasons.

(Tyre Phillips is No. 74)

Run game

Here are some players the Ravens have selected in the NFL draft over the last five seasons:

OT Daniel Faalele: 6’9, 380 pounds
OG Ben Cleveland: 6’6, 357 pounds
OL Tyre Phillips: 6’5, 345 pounds
OT Orlando Brown Jr.: 6’8, 363 pounds
OC Bradley Bozeman: 6’5, 325 pounds

(Conveniently doesn’t list Tyler Linderbaum)

Jokes aside, there’s an obvious prototype that Baltimore looks for in their offensive linemen. They want powerful players who can dominate the point of attack and displace defenders. Phillips certainly has power, but consistently maximizing his power wasn’t always guaranteed. However, he has this in his toolbox:

(right tackle)

Baltimore runs a halfback draw, selling a pass before they run the football. Phillips, by design, is initially passive in his attack. Jadeveon Clowney (90) bites on the pass and realizes it’s a run; Phillips does a very good job sinking his body and exploding low to high as Clowney reacts to the run. Phillips gets his hands inside and tosses Clowney to the ground as the former first overall pick in the 2014 draft reaches to tackle Devonta Freeman (33).

(right guard)

Phillips does a great job removing Maxx Crosby (98) from the play by closing width, making contact, and using force to get weight on Crosby’s back leg as he attempts to anchor in place. Phillips’ footwork, ability to sink his hips, and power are encouraging signs on this play that resulted in a good gain for running back Ty’Son Williams (34).

(right tackle)

Phillips’ wide frame and strength in tight spaces allow him to do well as a down blocker, especially when a defender slants in a direction that is advantageous for the 25-year-old linemen. Chris Wormley (95) - a former Raven - slants inside to penetrate the B-Gap, but gives Phillips easy access to create an opening for Devonta Freeman in the six hole. It’s an easy touchdown for Baltimore.

(right tackle)

First off, that juke by Devonta Freeman against Jessie Bates (30) was incredible. I watched it a dozen times, and I’m still fascinated. As for Phillips, he does well on the combo block, albeit no one climbs to pick up Logan Wilson (55). Phillips’ power takes the defensive lineman back a few yards, and he’s positioned well to give Freeman an ally on the pin-pull with the backside guard and tackle.

(right tackle)

Phillips isn’t exactly fleet of foot at his size, so it was impressive to see him successfully reach a defender significantly wide of him, albeit wide receiver Devin Duvernay (13) assists with the chip. Phillips gets to the edge rusher’s outside shoulder and swings his hips around to create a rushing lane for Freeman.

(right guard)

In the preseason, Phillips pulled well to kick out the linebacker who came down to the line of scrimmage. Phillips isn’t very quick or explosive into the point of contact, but he is very large and powerful. He positions his body well and gives the running back space to operate, albeit another defensive lineman made a nice tackle at the line of scrimmage.

Pass blocking

(right guard)

In Week 1 last season, Phillips does an excellent job staying in front of the Raiders’ defensive lineman. The defender attempts to club Phillips away and work outside, but Phillips keeps his inside hand on the breastplate of the defender and mirrors his movements, staying low and active.

(right guard)

Phillips quickly engages his hands and forces the defensive lineman up towards help, showing power and dictating the play. He then comes off the block and focuses on the EDGE rusher who switched (in a sloppy manner); Phillips stayed calm and was in position to handle the twist.

(right guard)

Phillips displays a good anchor against the Raiders defensive lineman who attempts to bull-rush. The former Mississippi State Bulldog maintains a low profile and anchors into the ground, sitting back on his hips and absorbing contact.

Range

Phillips has the ability to do a solid job exploding out of his stance and covering ground in a pass set. He’s far too inconsistent with his hips, and he’ll open his gate early. Still, there are several clips, like the ones below, where he does an adequate job staying square, reaching his landmark, and minimizing the defender’s angle to the quarterback.

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

As you’ll see below, his ability to successfully perform this task is troublesome.

Negatives

Phillips allowed 33 pressures and seven sacks in 479 pass blocking snaps over the last two seasons. His attempt to play tackle was not successful relative to his snaps at guard.

Protecting his outside shoulder

Phillips allows pass rushers to win high side too often. He is susceptible to the rip move, opens his hips prematurely - giving an easier path inside - and his overall use of hands are late; he also can lean into punches that aren’t well framed.

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

Phillips also had two false start penalties in the Ravens’ second preseason game.

Power rush

Phillips’ center of gravity is high, leading to a more exposed chest. This presented a target for opposing pass rushers to exploit with power moves through his chest. It’s difficult to successfully move a player who is 345 pounds; however, pass rushers from wider angles who possess excellent play strength were successful with their bull-rush, and Phillips anchor was marginal in those situations. This issue was exacerbated when Phillips opened his hips early to match the speed of quicker rushers (who were powerful).

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

Sustaining contact/balance

Phillips makes contact but won’t consistently keep his feet moving to sustain said contact. His grip strength is solid, but his hand placement is erratic, and it doesn’t maximize his ability to latch and control defenders.

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

(right tackle)

Final thoughts

Phillips is massive and powerful. He’s played multiple positions and has flash plays of adequate effectiveness. The flash doesn’t always shine bright, and the technique, consistency, and balance are issues that lead to frustrating mistakes. Most of the problems within Phillips’ film were at tackle, where he played the majority of snaps last season.

Phillips seemed more comfortable at guard. His issues with protecting his outside shoulder are mitigated inside - it’s easier to operate with a friend on each side. I hope his role is at guard for the Giants, where he can use his power to help open rushing lanes for Saquon Barkley. I don’t have an issue with the Giants taking a swing on a former Day 2 pick who has experience.

Offensive line coach Bobby Johnson must get the most out of Phillips, who can improve his hand usage (timing/placement), footwork, body control, and overall technique. If Johnson can help Phillips realize his potential, this signing could help the Giants in 2022.