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What could Monmouth wide receiver Reggie White Jr. bring to the Giants?

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Let’s see what we can learn

Picture courtesy the Monmouth athletic department

Looking across the crop of draftees and undrafted free agents, one name stands out among the rest: Reggie White Jr.

Anyone with an ounce of knowledge about the history of the NFL knows why that name jumps off the page.

But while Reggie White Jr.’s father was indeed a 6-foot-5 inch, 290-pound defensive lineman who played in the NFL in the early 1990s, he wasn’t that Reggie White. But while he isn’t the son of an NFL legend, Monmouth wide receiver Reggie White Jr. is still plenty intriguing as a player.

The Giants signed him after the draft as an undrafted free agent, and he could be a player to watch over the course of the summer. UDFAs as a whole have the fourth-highest success rate (just behind second- and third-round picks), that has more to do with volume — there are fare more undrafted free agents signed than players drafted in any one round.

Every so often, however, a player will fall through the cracks and present an opportunity in the scramble after the draft. Reggie White Jr.’s athletic upside could be that opportunity for the Giants this year.

What did they get when they signed the young man from Monmouth?

Measurables

Height: 6-foot-2
Weight: 208 pounds

(Note: All measurements taken from Monmouth’s pro day)

Pros

  • Excellent combination of size and athleticism.
  • Flashes the ability to be a “hands” catcher.
  • Tries to use his body to shield the ball from defenders.
  • Uses his size to bully smaller defensive backs.
  • Willing blocker, with the size to be effective.
  • Has the agility to be a good route runner.

Cons

  • Route running needs work.
  • Needs to improve his release against press coverage.
  • Played at a lower level of competition.
  • Doesn’t always run his routes with a sense of urgency.

Prospect Video

What They’re Saying

Appealing small-school wideout with the size and athleticism that helps him stand-out when the tape is rolling. He’s a springy leaper with a wide catch radius who snares balls outside his frame or goes up and over cornerbacks to bring it in. His routes are upright and dull and won’t create much NFL separation, but his outstanding testing numbers show he has the ability to play faster and quicker for teams willing to stash and coach him. White is a developmental prospect with a plus ceiling if the coaching clicks with him.

- Lance Zierlein (NFL.com - Scouting Report)

What does Reggie White Jr. bring to the Giants?

In a word: Potential.

Potential can be something of a dirty word when it comes to prospects and the draft. Players who are more potential than production tend to be risks for coaching staffs, and too much risk could cost jobs after a poor season.

But when it comes to undrafted free agents, that risk is pretty well mitigated because nobody really expects them to pan out. Every so often, however, one of those UDFAs pans out and blossoms into a player for a team. They are usually prospects who slip through the cracks for one reason or another, but have talent to carry them to the next level. Players like Victor Cruz, who had a tumultuous college career, or Romeo Okwara, who hadn’t yet realized his physical upside.

The Giants are hoping that Reggie White Jr. is another such prospect. Playing for Monmouth he was able to fly under the radar, and wasn’t able to show off his physical abilities on a bigger stage against premier competition. But those abilities are intriguing.

The Giants’ receiver room is crowded, but White has a blend of size and athleticism that only Cody Latimer and Darius Slayton can match. The hope is that making football his full time job under NFL coaching will help him realize that upside.