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After Brett Jones, who else can the Giants trade?

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The most likely answer is “no one”

NFL: New York Giants at Cleveland Browns
John Jerry
Scott R. Galvin-USA TODAY Sports

Now that the New York Giants have traded backup center Brett Jones to the Minnesota Vikings, giving themselves $2.914 million in desperately-needed salary cap relief, I would love to give you a list of other players the Giants could trade as they set their 53-man roster.

In fact, that’s what I sat down to do. Problem is, I can’t. There is no list. The Giants parted ways with Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie in the offseason. They shed the contract of Jason Pierre-Paul via trade, which I thought was an excellent move.

John Jerry? Please. After Saturday’s roster cuts there are going to be a plethora of veteran guards of Jerry’s ilk on the market. I seriously doubt anyone is going to trade for Jerry and take on the remaining $1.575 million of his deal, a number provided by Jason Fitzgerald of Over The Cap. Per Fitzgerald, that includes Jerry’s $1.075 base salary and up to $500,000 in per game bonuses. OTC’s database shows that the Giants can save $1.075 million by cutting him, but they would still be on the hook for $2.525 million in dead money.

Roger Lewis Jr.? Yes, he had 36 catches last season. Like Jerry, though, there will be receivers like, or better, than Lewis available via waivers or free agency after Saturday.

You might wish someone would, but no one is trading for the contracts of Jonathan Stewart or Patrick Omameh. Ereck Flowers? You might want him gone, but the Giants don’t have a better option at right tackle.

Maybe the Giants won’t have roster room for both Robert Thomas and A.J. Francis. Highly unlikely, though, that any backup defensive tackle has trade value. Andrew Adams or William Gay. Nada. Mark Herzlich or Calvin Munson? Seriously?

Unless GM Dave Gettleman can pull a rabbit out of a hat, it doesn’t really look like the Giants have many more pieces they would be willing to trade — and actually able to get a return for.